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Marie Michielssen has a strong predilection for materials that she can model manually. She either does this completely intuitively, as in the case of the organic plaster Sculpture Lamp and the papier-mâché pots with matching lids, or rationally with an interplay of graphic lines, such as her stoneware and concrete pots and wine cooler. With her Disc Lamp and decorative set of four spatial figures, the lines become even more austere, but the natural aspects of the materials, with all their irregularities, always remain visible. Only for the reddish brown and dark green coffee tables does she deviate from that approach to give them a perfect finish.

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Pawn

Following the success of her cylindrical seats, Marie Michielssen expands her collection of small furniture for Serax with two coffee tables in the same style and colours. Her characteristic graphic play of tight round shapes is now given a very clean finish. With its 68 cm diameter and 21 cm height, the reddish-brown table is slightly smaller than the dark green table with a diameter of 78 cm and a height of 25 cm. By creating the impression that the tables float above the ground, the designer adds a playful touch to an otherwise uncompromising design.

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Cold cubism

The concrete wine cooler by Marie Michielssen for Serax delineates her quest for the ultimate interplay of lines that previously resulted in a work of art. Now, she translates that graphic pattern into a beautiful and functional design object. An irregular stack of concrete blocks and beams, with a nod to cubist architecture. The cold nature of the concrete keeps the wine cool until the very last glass.

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As with her artworks, the concrete Seventies pots show a relief with round shapes on top of extremely tight squares. Contrary to her more organic designs, the proportions are almost mathematically calculated. The concrete is robust, cool, and pure; the shapes are rational. The round forms add a soft touch. Combined, they are reminiscent of the patterns from the seventies, but in the signature style of Marie Michielssen. Whether or not filled with greenery, the large and small pots enliven every setting with an artistic note.
 

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With her round and oval concrete pots, Marie Michielssen explores the more masculine aspects of design in terms of material, finish, as well as the design itself. The material is robust; the rough finish reinforces that feeling. The shapes are rational and, like many of her artworks, they stem from her predilection for graphic lines and spatial figures. The three different oval pots, for example, have horizontal or vertical rectangular handles on the side, while the ears of the two taller round pots rather adopt the art deco shape that is often reflected in the artworks and designs of Serax's house designer.

 

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Earth

The Earth collection by Marie Michielssen reflects her love for natural materials and earthy colours. These large pots were designed with pronounced ears to emphasise the pure, naïve appearance of the material. The fibreglass finish on the inside of the pots protects the papier-mâché against moisture and soil when used as a flowerpot, while the accompanying cover allows you to close them neatly when they are used as a laundry basket. The smallest pot in this series has retained the colour of the papier-mâché, the middle was given that of cardboard, and the largest was painted black. Unobtrusive colours that come into their own in every environment.
 

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Sculpture Lamp

With her Sculpture Lamp, the Antwerp designer translated one of her artworks into a beautiful and functional lighting object. Entirely led by her intuition, she modelled the plaster by hand into an organic frame. A simple, white socket at the end of a fabric-covered cable hangs loosely from the inside, creating an atmosphere of warm light. The irregular lines of the sculpture generate a unique shadow play.